EAT SCIENCE FICTION

Gerber_Picante_Sauce

Could the future be so cruel?

     I love food, and it shows in my fiction. There aren’t many stories I write that go by without the characters having a meal. I’m working on a story now, and my characters just finished a Kazakh-inspired meal of mutton and rice with dried fruit and garlic. In Kitty Itty And The Seawall Broke, mother and son enjoy a lunch of bread with ham-seasoned foraged beans on a North Carolina coast impovershed by the effects of sea level rise. Sudden homelessness does not deter the hero of Isolation from munching down on some hot crispy cuy in an underground kitchen. Even in super-short Labor Of Love, the alcohol-addicted protagonist takes time out from his quest for drink to scarf down a couple of “Kraut and Cheezies” from a fast-food joint.

     It’s not that I always write when I’m hungry — though I can just about always find room for a snack.  It’s that food is often forgotten in fiction.  Food, after all, is not the main part of the story. It’s not the point. It shouldn’t be center stage, except in the rarest of circumstances, as in Pig where the central situation is that the main character’s food begins talking to her, begging her piteously not to consume it — much to her dismay.

     But most of the time, the food is an aside, and it’s a challenge to integrate it into a story and not have it stick out like it doesn’t belong. But, for me, writing is about life, just as eating is about life. In the real world, people socialize around food. They think about food. They worry about whether they have enough money to buy groceries that will last until next paycheck, they worry if the meat department will have the right sized rib roast for Easter dinner, they’re afraid they’ve burnt the toast, they invite colleagues to talk business over tapas, they stop for food on the way to the hospital to visit a sick relative, they ask the kids how the school week went over Saturday morning eggs and bacon.

     They’ll do all of these things in the future, too. Oh, some details may change. Maybe the kids will go to school via internet instead of taking the bus. Maybe the meat will be grown in a nutrient solution rather than on the hoof. Maybe the pasta will be made in a printer instead of rolled out in a factory. Interstellar colonists may eat alien fruit, or aliens might come to nosh on us, as so many stories have suggested.

     But unless something very radical indeed happens, like the whole world up and loading itself into a virtual reality, we’ll always have the social nexus and sensory joy of eating food. And maybe, if we’re all virtual beings, we’ll still choose to do it anyway, even if it’s unnecessary.

     Because food is comforting. Eating is primal and elemental to us. Mealtimes, for time immemorial, have cemented families and friendships. So given how vital it has been and is to human society, I like to carry that vitality into the future as I imagine it.

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About Tao23

I write about my science fiction and fantasy writing--and plenty of other things--at sabarton.com

Posted on March 25, 2015, in Food, Science Fiction and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. Great post! I never thought about the potential that food/meals has in stories. I admit that sometimes I forget my characters have to eat at all and they end up starving for a few days!

    • Part of the potential… and I really should do a followup post on it, since it’s a pretty big part of food in fiction that I missed here… is food for setting and characterization. A single serving nuke meal says ‘loner’, a plate of pork chops can say ‘farmhouse,’ and so on. 🙂

      • That’s so true! Thank you for pointing that out. I have to remember this for future writing 🙂 and if you do choose to write about food for characterization and setting I’d definitely read it.

  2. Dat baby face 0_0
    Shivers…

    Food in sci fi stuff…interesting
    I’ll keep that in mind
    I’ve thought about food in fantasy but not sci fi
    Great idea! Thanks! 🙂

  1. Pingback: Eat MORE Science Fiction — Any Fiction At All, Really | S.A. Barton: Seriously Eclectic

  2. Pingback: Work In Progress, Served In Six (I Think) Courses | S.A. Barton: Seriously Eclectic

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